The US Food and Drug Administration wants to find out if the practice of modifying oocytes for use in in vitro fertilization is safe and scientifically sound, and held a hearing this week to launch a review of the process. Although it is sometimes referred to as three-parent baby-making, the procedure is not as kinky as it sounds, nor is it a likely set-up for a situation comedy, as very little DNA is contributed by the donor, but it has triggered some scientific, safety, and ethical concerns.

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