A Faux Shortage?

It has become conventional wisdom that the US currently faces a shortage of science and engineering talent, in large part because our K-12 schools aren't getting the job done in the STEM fields. The economic future of the country lies in science and engineering, and there are jobs out there waiting to be filled by all sorts of specialized, educated, and talented workers.
But there simply are not enough math whizzes with pocket protectors out there to fill them, the thinking goes. Even President Obama has made spurring STEM education a sort of running pet subject.

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