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Engaging Slim Shady

Janet Stemwedel first asked her readers what they would do if they were working with a scientist they feel might be "shady." Many of her readers says that they'd run from the situation, though they acknowledge they should try to get more information. In her next post, Stemwedel gives her thoughts, namely that working with a suspect scientist could hurt your career but that you'll still run into that person at meetings. "For both the individual scientist and the scientific community, the issue boils down to making your best decision in the absence of complete information," she writes, adding that you have to judge the pros of cons of engaging with the shady scientist and the aftermath.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.