Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Don't Worry, It Will Still Identify Bird Calls

Gone are the days when a cell phone could just be a cell phone -- and for MacGyver-minded scientists, that could be a very good thing. In this article, the New York Times reports on a project from UCLA's Aydogan Ozcan, who has figured out how to convert cell phones into microscopes using "about $10 worth of off-the-shelf hardware." The story adds, "The adapted phones may be used for screening in places far from hospitals, technicians or diagnostic laboratories."

Over at DIYbio, blogger Tito is all over this concept. In this post, he describes various attempts to turn his iPhone into a microscope after being inspired by the CellScope project out of UC Berkeley and the Hackteria project from iGEM. Tito notes that you won't get to your phone/microscope using just any random equipment. "Overall, I went through a lot of crummy ideas to get to some ok ones," he writes. "The next step is mobility."

The Scan

UK Pilot Study Suggests Digital Pathway May Expand BRCA Testing in Breast Cancer

A randomized pilot study in the Journal of Medical Genetics points to similar outcomes for breast cancer patients receiving germline BRCA testing through fully digital or partially digital testing pathways.

Survey Sees Genetic Literacy on the Rise, Though Further Education Needed

Survey participants appear to have higher genetic familiarity, knowledge, and skills compared to 2013, though 'room for improvement' remains, an AJHG paper finds.

Study Reveals Molecular, Clinical Features in Colorectal Cancer Cases Involving Multiple Primary Tumors

Researchers compare mismatch repair, microsatellite instability, and tumor mutation burden patterns in synchronous multiple- or single primary colorectal cancers.

FarGen Phase One Sequences Exomes of Nearly 500 From Faroe Islands

The analysis in the European Journal of Human Genetics finds few rare variants and limited geographic structure among Faroese individuals.