If whole-genome sequencing ever becomes a common part of treating patients, as is expected by many, some tricky ethical and privacy-related problems may arise, most notably questions about what should be done about incidental findings and malevolent things doctors find in the genome that have no treatment.

At Washington University in St. Louis this week, at a global center of genomic medicine, a few experts met in a panel discussion to sift around a bit through the morass of ethical questions whole-genome sequencing might stir up when it does hit the clinic.

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