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Scientific Dancing

The second annual Dance Your PhD contest has crowned a winner, says the New Scientist Culture Lab blog's Nidhi Subbaraman. Molecular biologist Maureen McKeague from Carleton University in Ottawa, who danced her thesis entitled "Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX," won when she and her entire lab group danced as DNA binding to target molecules. The contest, sponsored by GonzoLabs, Science, and the Imagine Science Film Festival allows researchers a chance to win money — $500 a piece to the four finalists and an additional $500 to the winner — and imaginatively showcase their research, Subbaraman says. The judging was based on how creative the researchers were, and how well they blended science with the "artistic elements of their performance," Subbaraman adds. Next year's contest will kick off in June 2011.

Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX from Maureen McKeague on Vimeo.

The Scan

Study Finds Few FDA Post-Market Regulatory Actions Backed by Research, Public Assessments

A Yale University-led team examines in The BMJ safety signals from the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System and whether they led to regulatory action.

Duke University Team Develops Programmable RNA Tool for Cell Editing

Researchers have developed an RNA-based editing tool that can target specific cells, as they describe in Nature.

Novel Gene Editing Approach for Treating Cystic Fibrosis

Researchers in Science Advances report on their development of a non-nuclease-based gene editing approach they hope to apply to treat cystic fibrosis.

Study Tracks Responses in Patients Pursuing Polygenic Risk Score Profiling

Using interviews, researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics qualitatively assess individuals' motivations for, and experiences with, direct-to-consumer polygenic risk score testing.