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Scientific Dancing

The second annual Dance Your PhD contest has crowned a winner, says the New Scientist Culture Lab blog's Nidhi Subbaraman. Molecular biologist Maureen McKeague from Carleton University in Ottawa, who danced her thesis entitled "Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX," won when she and her entire lab group danced as DNA binding to target molecules. The contest, sponsored by GonzoLabs, Science, and the Imagine Science Film Festival allows researchers a chance to win money — $500 a piece to the four finalists and an additional $500 to the winner — and imaginatively showcase their research, Subbaraman says. The judging was based on how creative the researchers were, and how well they blended science with the "artistic elements of their performance," Subbaraman adds. Next year's contest will kick off in June 2011.

Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX from Maureen McKeague on Vimeo.

The Scan

Two J&J Doses

Johnson & Johnson says two doses of its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine provides increased protection against symptomatic COVID-19, CNN reports.

Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Response in Kids

The Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in a lower-dose format appears to generate an immune response among children, according to the Washington Post.

Chicken Changes to Prevent Disease

The Guardian writes that researchers are looking at gene editing chickens to help prevent future pandemics.

PNAS Papers on Siberian Dog Ancestry, Insect Reproduction, Hippocampal Neurogenesis

In PNAS this week: ancestry and admixture among Siberian dogs, hormone role in fruit fly reproduction, and more.