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Crash Course in Genomics

Mark this as a catch-all crash course in genomics for your non-scientist friends and family. In a special eight-part report on the human genome, The Economist details advances – and disappointments – in biomedical research since the completion of the Human Genome Project. From Venter’s synthetic genome to the sequencing of Neanderthal DNA, to personal genomics, drug discovery, and the build-up at the BGI, the author details nearly every major event in genomics post-HGP. "Though understanding the genome has proved more complicated than expected, no discovery made so far suggests anything other than that all the information needed to make a cell is squirreled away in the DNA. Yet the whole is somehow greater than the sum of its parts," the article reads, succinctly summarizing the previously unforeseen challenges and complexities of understanding the genetic code.

The Daily Scan would like to thank the story’s illustrator, Emiliano Ponizi, for some great desktop background images.

The Scan

Renewed Gain-of-Function Worries

The New York Times writes that the pandemic is renewing concerns about gain-of-function research.

Who's Getting the Patents?

A trio of researchers has analyzed gender trends in biomedical patents issued between 1976 and 2010 in the US, New Scientist reports.

Other Uses

CBS Sunday Morning looks at how mRNA vaccine technology could be applied beyond SARS-CoV-2.

PLOS Papers Present Analysis of Cervicovaginal Microbiome, Glycosylation in Model Archaea, More

In PLOS this week: functional potential of the cervicovaginal microbiome, glycosylation patterns in model archaea, and more.