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A Computer on the Inside

Rather than thinking about computers in terms of their speed and memory, Stanford University's Drew Endy writes in an essay in The New York Times that people should consider computers' abilities to use important information. "A better way to think about the future of computing might be to ask when and where we could improve our ability to compute upon information that we greatly care about," he writes. And, as people care greatly about their health, simple computers could be made using biological materials like DNA or RNA to monitor people's health from inside their own cells. "I dream of much broader achievements," Endy adds. "For example, suppose we could partner with microbes and plants to record events, natural or otherwise, and convert this information into easily observed signals. That would greatly expand our ability to monitor the environment."

The Scan

Fertility Fraud Found

Consumer genetic testing has uncovered cases of fertility fraud that are leading to lawsuits, according to USA Today.

Ties Between Vigorous Exercise, ALS in Genetically At-Risk People

Regular strenuous exercise could contribute to motor neuron disease development among those already at genetic risk, Sky News reports.

Test Warning

The Guardian writes that the US regulators have warned against using a rapid COVID-19 test that is a key part of mass testing in the UK.

Science Papers Examine Feedback Mechanism Affecting Xist, Continuous Health Monitoring for Precision Medicine

In Science this week: analysis of cis confinement of the X-inactive specific transcript, and more.