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Christian de Duve Dies

Christian de Duve, who won the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, has died, the New York Times reports. He was 95. De Duve discovered the lysosome and received the Nobel along with Albert Claude, who discovered mitochondria, and George Palade, who uncovered the ribosome, "for their discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell," according to the Nobel Foundation.

Those discoveries, the Times notes, paved the way for modern cell biology, and de Duve's finding particularly influenced the study of Tay-Sachs disease and other genetic lysosomal storage disorders. "We are sick because our cells are sick," de Duve said.

The Scan

Not as High as Hoped

The Associated Press says initial results from a trial of CureVac's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine suggests low effectiveness in preventing COVID-19.

Finding Freshwater DNA

A new research project plans to use eDNA sampling to analyze freshwater rivers across the world, the Guardian reports.

Rise in Payments

Kaiser Health News investigates the rise of payments made by medical device companies to surgeons that could be in violation of anti-kickback laws.

Nature Papers Present Ginkgo Biloba Genome Assembly, Collection of Polygenic Indexes, More

In Nature this week: a nearly complete Ginkgo biloba genome assembly, polygenic indexes for dozens of phenotypes, and more.