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Carl Woese Dies

Carl Woese, who discovered a third domain of life —the archaea — has died, reports The New York Times. He was 84. In 1977, Woese, who worked at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his colleagues uncovered a group of single-cell organisms that were different from the known groups of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By examining and comparing the ribosomal DNA of archaea, Woese was able to determine that archaea had evolved separately from a common ancestor shared by prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the Times notes. "He put on the table a metric for determining evolutionary relatedness," Norman Pace, a microbiologist and biochemist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, tells the Times. "His results were the first to prove that all life on earth was related."

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.