The Foundation for Biomedical Research's Paul McKellips spent around five months this year training the Afghan National Army in best media practices. "It was his second stint in this line of work, having helped train the Iraqi National Army a few years earlier," The Appleton (Wis.) Post-Crescent's Shane Nyman says in a profile of McKellips' career path. "His work overseas is just one of many road-less-traveled bullet points on the resume for the 52-year-old, who just released his first novel, the bio-terror thriller, Uncaged," Nyman adds.

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