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Policy Prereqs

Over at the PostDocsForum, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Meghan Mott says that when it comes to working in science policy, "there are plenty of ways to get your foot in the door, but it takes considerable time and effort." Fellowships are one way to break into the field, but far from the only, she says. Internships are also desirable entry-points. "If fellowships and internships don't work out, volunteering for science policy committees is a great way to get involved in your free time," Mott says. Another idea is to become involved in advocacy or policy interest groups sponsored by professional societies, like the Society for Neuroscience's committee on Government and Public Affairs or the National Postdoctoral Association's advocacy committee, for example. Still, "no matter how you enter science policy, the job requirements are the same," Mott says. "You must have a broad knowledge of science and science policy, excellent verbal and written communication skills, analytical abilities, and experience in project management."

The Scan

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.

Fragile X Syndrome Mutations Found With Comprehensive Testing Method

Researchers in Clinical Chemistry found fragile X syndrome expansions and other FMR1 mutations with ties to the intellectual disability condition using a long-range PCR and long-read sequencing approach.

Team Presents Strategy for Speedy Species Detection in Metagenomic Sequence Data

A computational approach presented in PLOS Computational Biology produced fewer false-positive species identifications in simulated and authentic metagenomic sequences.

Genetic Risk Factors for Hypertension Can Help Identify Those at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

Genetically predicted high blood pressure risk is also associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, a new JAMA Cardiology study says.