Personal Ethics, Professional Etiquette | GenomeWeb

At her blog, Science Professor contemplates how researchers react to the unsavory actions of other scientists. Specifically, when drafting a manuscript, she wonders whether "citing a creep somehow condones [that person's] creep-ish behavior." Science Professor says that even if a disgraced researcher's science has not been affected by his or her perceived ethical lapse, it could affect "how you feel about the research, but also how others perceive the work," based solely on the cited author's association to some misgiving.

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