In a session devoted to the future of biomedical research at the Partnering for Cures meeting in New York City this week, panelists expressed optimism about the resourcefulness of young investigators they've interacted with, and shared advice gleaned from their own experiences. Despite funding insecurities, MIT's Sebastian Seung said he believes that up-and-coming scientists are "going to do a tremendous job if we can give them the support they need." Columbia University's Brent Stockwell said that "upcoming scientists have to be open-minded.

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