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'Not Just a Woman's Problem'

This week, Rice University's Elaine Howard Ecklund and Southern Methodist University's Anne Lincoln report in PLoS One that "having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction." This, the authors add, is "not just a woman's problem." Indeed, Ecklund and Lincoln say that the negative effect on life satisfaction "of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction." The researchers also show that grad students and postdocs who have had fewer children than they desired "are more likely to … exit science entirely," irrespective of gender. "… It is concerning," the authors write, "that a significant proportion of men and women … are considering leaving science" because of the impacts scientific careers can have on family life. The authors say their work could inform future mentoring services and family leave policies at research institutions.

The Scan

Study Links Evolution of Longevity, Social Organization in Mammals

With the help of comparative phylogenetics and transcriptomics, researchers in Nature Communications see ties between lifespan and social organization in mammals.

Tumor Microenvironment Immune Score Provides Immunotherapy Response, Prognostic Insights

Using multiple in situ analyses and RNA sequence data, researchers in eBioMedicine have developed a score associated with immunotherapy response or survival.

CRISPR-Based Method for Finding Cancer-Associated Exosomal MicroRNAs in Blood

A team from China presents in ACS Sensors a liposome-mediated membrane fusion strategy for detecting miRNAs carried in exosomes in the blood with a CRISPR-mediated reporter system.

Drug Response Variants May Be Distinct in Somatic, Germline Samples

Based on variants from across 21 drug response genes, researchers in The Pharmacogenomics Journal suspect that tumor-only DNA sequences may miss drug response clues found in the germline.