Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Financial Aid

A story at The Chronicle of Higher Education takes a look at the less-than-rosy financial situations some PhDs in the US have found themselves in. The article examines what the Chronicle calls "an often overlooked, and growing, subgroup of PhD recipients, adjunct professors, and other Americans with advanced degrees" — those who have applied for some form of government assistance since late 2007.

Of the 22 million Americans with master's degrees or higher in 2010, about 360,000 were receiving some kind of public assistance, according to the latest Current Population Survey released by the US Census Bureau in March 2011. In 2010, a total of 44 million people nationally received food stamps or some other form of public aid, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

As Penn State University's Michael Bérubé puts it: "Everyone thinks a PhD pretty much guarantees you a living wage," he tells the Chronicle. "But I've been hearing all year from non-tenure-track faculty making under $20,000."

The Scan

Could Cost Billions

NBC News reports that the new Alzheimer's disease drug from Biogen could cost Medicare in the US billions of dollars.

Not Quite Sent

The Biden Administration likely won't meet its goal of sending 80 million SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses abroad by the end of the month, according to the Washington Post.

DTC Regulation Proposals

A new report calls on UK policymakers to review direct-to-consumer genetic testing regulations, the Independent reports.

PNAS Papers on Mosquito MicroRNAs, Acute Kidney Injury, Trichothiodystrophy

In PNAS this week: microRNAs involved in Aedes aegypti reproduction, proximal tubule cell response to kidney injury, and more.