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Double Duty

Over at Benchfly, reader Darren asks whether it's best to join two labs jointly or form a collaboration between them in the case of an overlapping project. Dora Farkas suggests that Darren go with the logistically simpler solution, whichever it may be. Some graduate students in this scenario "are co-advised" by professors in the two labs, "so in a way, they would join both groups simultaneously. Other students have one main advisor and the other professor becomes an unofficial co-advisor and collaborator," Farkas says. Still, while joining two labs "could be twice the fun," it could also mean twice the work. While "two holiday parties and twice as many group lunches" are attractive benefits, imagine having to attend "twice as many group meetings and have individual meetings with both professors," she says.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.