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Canadian Scientists Outmanuever the Government

In September, Discover Magazine's Bad Astronomy blog reported that the ruling conservative party in Canada was forcing government scientists to get permission before publishing results to the public. But there's a difference between making sure results are correctly publicized and deciding whether they can be distributed to the public at all, Bad Astronomy noted at the time, likening the rule to government censorship of scientific results. Now, Canada's scientists have decided to do something about the restrictions by launching a new Web site, Publicscience.ca, which features videos and interviews with government researchers, Bad Astronomy reports, adding, "The site is a beautiful thumb-to-the-nose to those in the government who think they can suppress science. ... Awesome."

The Scan

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.

Estonian Biobank Team Digs into Results Return Strategies, Experiences

Researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics outline a procedure developed for individual return of results for the population biobank, along with participant experiences conveyed in survey data.

Rare Recessive Disease Insights Found in Individual Genomes

Researchers predict in Genome Medicine cross-population deletions and autosomal recessive disease impacts by analyzing recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination-related deletions.

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.