Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Call for Open Pharma Access

Cory Doctorow argues at The Guardian that all, not just publicly funded, pharmaceutical research should be made open access. Many people, he says, agree that all publicly funded research should be available to the public — the main argument being that since the public funded it, they should be able to see the result. But Doctorow goes a step further.

He writes references a book by Ben Goldacre, called Bad Pharma, in which Goldacre notes that about half of pharmaceutical research is never published, likely due to results showing that the drug under study doesn't work. "The reason pharma companies should be required to publish their results isn't that they've received a public subsidy for the research. Rather, it is because they are asking for a governmental certification saying that their products are fit for consumption, and they are asking for regulatory space to allow doctors to write prescriptions for those products," Doctorow writes. "We need them to disclose their research – even if doing so undermines their profits – because without that research, we can't know if their products are fit for use."

The Scan

White-Tailed Deer Harbor SARS-CoV-2 Variants No Longer Infecting Humans, Study Finds

A new study in PNAS has found that white-tailed deer could act as a reservoir of SARS-CoV-2 variants no longer found among humans.

Study Points to Benefits of Local Consolidative Therapy, Targeted Treatments in Cancer Care

In JCO Precision Oncology, researchers report that local consolidative therapy combined with molecularly targeted treatments could improve survival for some lung cancer patients.

Genetic Variants That Lower LDL Cholesterol Linked to Reduced Heart Disease Risk

Rare variants in two genes that lower LDL cholesterol are also associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease, according to a new JAMA Cardiology study.

Study Links Evolution of Longevity, Social Organization in Mammals

With the help of comparative phylogenetics and transcriptomics, researchers in Nature Communications see ties between lifespan and social organization in mammals.