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Bertozzi for the Win

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that University of California, Berkeley, professor Carolyn Bertozzi has been awarded the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize — which "honors an outstanding mid-career inventor who is dedicated to improving our world through technological invention and innovation," according to the Lemelson-MIT program press release — for her work in the field of biotechnology. Bertozzi, who teaches chemistry and molecular and cellular biology, was awarded the honor for her research in manipulating living cells and their processes, the Chronicle says, adding that her work has led to advances in diagnosing and treating cancer and inflammatory diseases. The press release from Lemelson-MIT says Bertozzi is currently working on manipulating processes within living cells to engineer their surfaces and secreted proteins. She and her team study glycans and are developing nanotechnologies to probe biological systems, the release says.

The Scan

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.

Estonian Biobank Team Digs into Results Return Strategies, Experiences

Researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics outline a procedure developed for individual return of results for the population biobank, along with participant experiences conveyed in survey data.

Rare Recessive Disease Insights Found in Individual Genomes

Researchers predict in Genome Medicine cross-population deletions and autosomal recessive disease impacts by analyzing recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination-related deletions.

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.