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Aron Moscona, Discoverer of Cadherins, Dies

Aron Arthur Moscona, a developmental biologist who taught at the University of Chicago, has died at the age of 87. Moscana's work in the late 1950s to the early 1970s determined how cells in the developing embryo find each other and interact. His work led to the discovery of cadherins, cell surface molecules that allow cells to recognize and interact with one another. "It allowed other scientists ... to explore the processes by which blood cells leave the bone marrow to circulate, sperm and eggs free themselves, and skin cells cross gaps to close a wound," says an article in the New York Times.

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.