And It Did Work

The New York Times has a Q&A with Brian Druker, the researcher who developed Gleevec. When Druker started out as an oncologist in the '80s, "cancer was seen as something like a light switch that was stuck in an 'on' position. You were given a baseball bat, which was chemotherapy, and told to knock the light out with the bat," he says. That led him to study how cell growth is regulated and, eventually, brought him to Gleevec, which is now used by about 200,000 people.

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