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Add More Laureates to That List

The winners of the 2008 Nobel prize in chemistry are Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Tsien for their work on green fluorescent protein. Shimomura first isolated GFP from a jellyfish and showed that it glows under UV light; Chalifie demonstrated that it could tag cells; and Tsien worked on getting it to produce other colors.

At The Daily Transcript, Alex Palazzo is celebrating -- he'd guessed that Tsien would win. "This is a well deserved prize. Flip open any biomedical journal and you'll see why - Green Fluorescent Protein (aka GFP) is probably the most used gene in the world," he writes.

 

The Scan

Pig Organ Transplants Considered

The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Food and Drug Administration may soon allow clinical trials that involve transplanting pig organs into humans.

'Poo-Bank' Proposal

Harvard Medical School researchers suggest people should bank stool samples when they are young to transplant when they later develop age-related diseases.

Spurred to Develop Again

New Scientist reports that researchers may have uncovered why about 60 percent of in vitro fertilization embryos stop developing.

Science Papers Examine Breast Milk Cell Populations, Cerebral Cortex Cellular Diversity, Micronesia Population History

In Science this week: unique cell populations found within breast milk, 100 transcriptionally distinct cell populations uncovered in the cerebral cortex, and more.