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Fate Therapeutics, a company founded in late 2007 to commercialize stem-cell technology from several US academic institutions, said this week that it has added Dan Shoemaker as its chief technology officer.

Shoemaker was most recently chief scientific officer of ICx Biosystems. From 2003 to 2005, he was chief scientific officer of GHC Technologies; and from 1998 to 2003, he held several positions at Merck Research Laboratories, including director of target discovery, senior director at Rosetta Inpharmatics, and research fellow in the department of molecular neurosciences.

Shoemaker received his PhD in biochemistry from Stanford University and his BS in biochemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Fate Therapeutics is developing small molecules to activate the body’s own cells for regenerative medicine and to create and differentiate virus-free induced pluripotent stem cells for drug discovery and therapeutic development.

Last week, the company said that Rudolf Jaenisch, founding member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, joined Fate's team of scientific founders. The announcement coincided with that of Fate licensing IP from Whitehead related to Jaenisch's stem-cell reprogramming research.

The Scan

More Boosters for US

Following US Food and Drug Administration authorization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has endorsed booster doses of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, the Washington Post writes.

From a Pig

A genetically modified pig kidney was transplanted into a human without triggering an immune response, Reuters reports.

For Privacy's Sake

Wired reports that more US states are passing genetic privacy laws.

Science Paper on How Poaching Drove Evolution in African Elephants

In Science this week: poaching has led to the rapid evolution of tuskless African elephants.