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David Miller, Jack Faris, John Whealan, Chris Brodie, Gov. Deval Patrick, James Barry, James Collins, George Daley, Patricia Donahoe, Lila Gierasch, Richard Goldsby, David Lederman, Jeffrey Leiden, David Scadden, Alan Smith, Lydia Villa-Komaroff, Phillip

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Texas Tech University said this week that it has renamed its Office of Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property to the Office of Technology Commercialization, and has named David Miller vice chancellor of commercialization.
 
Miller’s previous title was managing director of the OTTIP.
 

 
Jack Faris will resign as president of the Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association in December, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported last week.
 
Faris joined WaBio, the state’s largest trade group representing life sciences companies, in February 2005 after serving as vice president for university relations at the University of Washington and director of community strategies for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, SPI reported.
 

 
John Whealan, deputy general counsel for intellectual property law and solicitor for the US Patent and Trademark Office, has joined the faculty of George Washington University School of Law as associate dean for intellectual property, Law.com reported last week.
 
Whealan had been PTO solicitor since January 2001. As solicitor, he managed an office of 25 attorneys that represent PTO in all federal court IP litigation and provide legal and policy advice to the rest of the PTO, according to the report.
 
He previously served as acting deputy solicitor and associated solicitor at the PTO, and has held positions as a staff attorney for the US International Trade Commission and a private practice lawyer with Fish & Neave in New York.
 

 
Chris Brodie has joined the North Carolina Biotechnology Center as vice president of corporate communications, the NCBC said last week.
 
Brodie previously was an associate editor of American Scientist which, like the biotech center, is headquartered in Research Triangle Park.
 
Brodie is the co-founder of Science Communicators of North Carolina, a more than 200-member professional organization of scientists, journalists, public information officers, teachers, and museum curators.
 

 
Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has named ten professionals to the state’s new scientific advisory board.
 
The board met May 7 with Patrick “to discuss ways that Massachusetts can create new economic opportunity and spur new discoveries in the life sciences sector,” according to a press release issued by the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a state-created quasi-public agency.
 
The new advisory board members are:
  • James Barry, vice president for corporate research and advanced technology development, Boston Scientific.
  • James Collins, professor of biomedical engineering, Boston University.
  • George Daley, associate professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology and of pediatrics, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Stem Cell Institute.
  • Patricia Donahoe, director of the pediatric surgical research laboratories and chief emerita of pediatric surgical services, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Marshall K. Bartlett professor of surgery, Harvard Medical School.
  • Lila Gierasch, professor of biophysical chemistry, department of biochemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
  • Richard Goldsby, John Woodruff Simpson lecturer and professor of biology, Amherst College.
  • David Lederman, founder and former board chairman, Abiomed.
  • Jeffrey Leiden, managing director, Clarus Ventures.
  • David Scadden, professor of medicine, Harvard University; co-chair, department of stem cell and regenerative biology, Harvard University; co-director, Harvard Stem Cell Institute; director, MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine.
  • Alan Smith, chief scientific officer, Genzyme.
  • Lydia Villa-Komaroff, CEO, Cytonome.
     
  • Phillip Zamore, professor of biochemistry and molecular pharmacology, UMass Medical School.