Few nations have gone as far as the UK to elevate stem-cell research into an anchor of its national life-science effort. In September 2007, the UK’s Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority ended eight months of debate by agreeing to allow research into chimera animal-human embryos, but on a case-by-case basis and under regulations limiting authorized projects to those deemed “necessary and desirable.”
 

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The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.