Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Sydney Brenner, Philippe Bogard

Premium

Sydney Brenner has received the 2005 UCSD/Merck Life Sciences Achievement Award, the University of California San Diego said last week. He is a distinguished professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and a recipient of the 2002 Nobel Prize in medicine, as well as an adjunct professor of biology at UCSD. He received the $25,000 award at a dinner at UCSD on April 1. Brenner was awarded the Nobel Prize for discoveries about how genes regulate organ growth and the process of programmed cell death. He also proved C. elegans to be a useful model organism. In addition, he established the existence of messenger RNA and characterized it further. Brenner holds a DPhil in chemistry from Oxford University and medicine and science degrees from the University of Witwatersand in Johannesburg, South Africa.


Philippe Bogard has become strategic marketing manager of Nonlinear Dynamics, the Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK-based company said last week. He joins Nonlinear from GE Healthcare, where he held various product management positions.

The Scan

Team Tracks Down Potential Blood Plasma Markers Linked to Heart Failure in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

Researchers in BMC Genomics found 10 differentially expressed proteins or metabolites that marked atrial fibrillation with heart failure cases.

Study Points to Synonymous Mutation Effects on E. Coli Enzyme Activity

Researchers in Nature Chemistry saw signs of enzyme activity shifts in the presence of synonymous mutations in a multiscale modeling analysis of three Escherichia coli genes.

Team Outlines Paternal Sample-Free Single-Gene Approach for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening

With data for nearly 9,200 pregnant individuals, researchers in Genetics in Medicine demonstrate the feasibility of their carrier screening and reflex single-gene non-invasive prenatal screening approach.

Germline-Targeting HIV Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase I Trial

A National Institutes of Health-led team reports in Science that a broadly neutralizing antibody HIV vaccine induced bnAb precursors in 97 percent of those given the vaccine.