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Scienion, Innopsys to Offer Combined Technologies

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Scienion and Innopsys today announced an agreement to combine each other's microarray technologies in a single offering to customers.

The firms said they will integrate their technologies for a broad range of applications and highlighted the integration of Scienion's sciFlexArrayer technology, which can be used for reverse-phase protein arrays, with Innopsys' InnoScan 710-IR near-infrared scanner, resulting in a product that "will significantly improve signal-to-noise ratios."

They said that systems will be offered as full out of box solutions, lowering the barrier of entry and making the reverse-phase protein array technology accessible to more researchers.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"Our customers will benefit from combining state-of-the-art printing and detection technologies of both companies, including full configuration and software integration, enabling advance performance and automation for such multiplex assays," Holger Eickhoff, CEO of Scienion, said in a statement.

Scienion has offices in Berlin and Dortmund, Germany and a US subsidiary in Princeton, NJ, and provides systems and services for contact-free printing of biological and chemical agents. Innopsys is based in Carbonne, France and develops microarray scanners.

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