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People in the News: Brynn Levy, Dale Levitzke, Stefan Gluck

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Brynn Levy has been elected president of the Cancer Cytogenomics Microarray Consortium. Levy, who is director of clinical cytogenetics at Columbia University Medical Center, will take the reins of the organization from current president Anwar Iqbal next year.


Dale Levitzke has been appointed vice president of global sales for life sciences at NanoString Technologies. Levitzke joins the company from Illumina, where he was senior director and global sales manager for the company's PCR division.

Previously, he was head of global sales for Helixis, general manager of Corbett Robotics, and core facility manager at the University of Newcastle's Analytical and Biomolecular Research Facility. He holds a BS in molecular biology from La Trobe University Melbourne.


Agendia has named Stefan Glück to be chair of its medical advisory board. Glück is a professor at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. He spent five years as clinical director of the Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute and had previously served as director of the Southern Alberta Breast Cancer Program at the Tom Baker Cancer Center and as a professor at the University of Calgary.

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