Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

People in the News: Alan Faichney, Stephen Chanock, Joseph Fraumeni

Premium

Alan Faichney had joined Arrayjet as non-executive chairman, the UK microarray instrument provider said this week.

Faichney has served as managing director of Concept Systems, an oil exploration company; senior vice president of Ion Geophysical, a seismic solutions firm; chief operating officer at DEM-Solutions, a Scottish software startup; and CEO of Edinburgh Instrumens, a scientific instruments vendor.


The National Cancer Institute has appointed Stephen Chanock to be director of NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and a scientific director of the institute.

Chanock takes over DCEG from founding director Joseph Fraumeni, who stepped down from the post a year ago.

Chanock formerly was a tenured investigator in the Genomic Variation Section of the Pediatric Oncology Branch in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, he was co-chair of NCI's Genetics, Genomics, and Proteomics Faculty, and he was chief of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory and the Laboratory of Translational Genomics. He also was acting director of the NCI Center for Cancer Genomics from 2012 to 2013.

BioArray News interviewed Chanock in 2011 about his role in supporting genome-wide association studies (BAN 3/1/2011).

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.