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People in the News: May 26, 2009

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Luminex has elected four Class III members to serve three-year terms on its board of directors. The company elected Patrick Balthrop, company president and CEO; Walter Lowenbaum, chairman and CEO of Mumboe and chairman of Luminex; and Kevin McNamara, director of Tyson Foods.

The company also has elected Edward Ogunro to serve as an independent director. Ogunro also serves on the board of Applied Neurosolutions, and he was a senior executive at Hospira.


Bob Michitarian will manage Levin & Co.'s national legal recruiting and consulting practice, the Boston law firm said last week.

Michitarian joined Levin & Co. in December 2008 as managing director. He previously served as vice president and general counsel at CoTherix, a South San Francisco, Calif.-based pharmaceutical company. He also held positions at Affymetrix, Genentech, and Latham & Watkins.


Carl Hull, who has succeeded Henry Nordhoff as CEO at Gen-Probe, has reached a contract agreement with the company. Under the agreement, Hull will receive an annual base salary of $635,000 and a bonus of around 75 percent of that salary, depending on the determination of the company's board of directors.

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