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NIH Seeks to Out-License Protein Microarray Technology

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Institutes of Health is seeking to out-license a protein microarray technology currently being developed by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, the NIH said last week.
 
According to the NIH, the technology comprises “a DNA microarray that becomes a protein microarray on demand and provides an efficient systematic approach to the study of protein interactions and drug target identification and validation.
 
"The technology allows a large number of proteins to be synthesized and immobilized at their individual site of expression on an ordered array without the need for protein purification. As a result, proteins are ready for subsequent use in binding studies and other analysis,” the NIH said.
 
Additional details about the technology are available from the NIH’s office of technology transfer.

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