Close Menu

The US National Human Genome Research Institute has awarded a total of more than $38 million in two sets of grants to 18 companies and laboratories, with the goal of producing new technologies to reduce the cost of sequencing a typical mammalian genome by 100-fold within five years, and by 10,000-fold in later years, from its current rate of about $10 million.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a GenomeWeb or 360Dx Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

Australia will not be regulating gene editing of plants, animals, and human cell lines as long as no new genetic material is incorporated, reports Nature News.

The Washington Post reports that the US Department of Agriculture told its researchers to label peer-reviewed articles as "preliminary" work.

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of both the coast redwood and the giant sequoia, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

In PNAS this week: study of epigenetic patterns in mammalian eggs, clonal expansion patterns in CD8+ T cells, and more.

May
15
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

This webinar will discuss how Radboud University Medical Center’s Department of Human Genetics is using exon-level copy number variant (CNV) detection by microarray to assist its efforts in constitutional genome testing.