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New Products: CTGT's HDT Array Tests, SciGene's CytoBrite Duo Slide Incubation System

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Connective Tissue Gene Tests (CTGT) has added 21 new assays to its menu of molecular diagnostics for inherited disorders affecting connective tissues.

The Allentown, Pa.-based company is now offering microarray, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing-based tests for genes associated with acromeselomic dysplasia, anauxetic dysplasia, cartilage-hair dysplasia, chondrodysplasia, desbuquois dysplasia, fibular hypoplasia, Meier-Gorlin syndrome, metaphyseal dysplasia, ostogenesis imperfecta, pycnodystosis, Roberts syndrome, SC phocomelia syndrome, and Spondylo-megaepiphyseal-metaphyseal dysplasia.

The pricing of CTGT's new tests depends on the technology used and the number of genes assessed. For its array-based tests, the company relies on its High-Density Targeted Array platform, an Agilent Technologies-manufactured chip for copy number variation detection.


SciGene recently launches its CytoBrite, Duo Slide Incubation System, a dual temperature slide heating instrument for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols.

The new system includes two independently controlled heating blocks that each hold a 6-slide removable tray, according to the Sunnyvale, Calif.-based firm. Following assay assembly, a slide tray is moved from one lower temperature heating position to a higher temperature position to perform the brief probe co-denaturation step then returned to the lower temperature position for hybridization.

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