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Ned Barnholt, William Sullivan, James Cullen, Thomas McNally, Hinrich Kehler, Jim Parina, William Murray, Carl Hull, Stephen Kondor, Peter Dansky, Stephen Oldfield, Jan Hughes, Macdonald Morris

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Agilent chairman, president and CEO Ned Barnholt will retire at the end of next month, the Palo Alto, Calif.-based firm announced Wednesday. Barnholt, who has served as CEO for the past six years, will be succeeded by William Sullivan, who currently serves as executive vice president and COO. Sullivan also oversees Agilent’s largest business, the Electronic Products and Solutions Group. James Cullen, who has served on Agilent’s board of directors since 2000, will take over as non-executive chairman upon Barnholt’s departure.


Thomas McNally has become vice chairman of Whatman, assuming functions from Howard Kelly, who stepped down as CEO in November, the company said last week. McNally, already a non-executive director of Whatman, will retain his new position until a new CEO is appointed. Previously, he held various positions at Abbott Laboratories. Also, Bob Thian, chairman of Whatman, will be responsible for the integration and management of Schleicher & Schuell, which Whatman acquired in November. In addition, Hinrich Kehler, until recently chairman of Schleicher & Schuell, has been appointed as a non-executive director. He holds a PhD in physical chemistry.


Jim Parina has been named director of sales and business development for Expression Analysis, the Durham, NC-based firm said last week. He previously was a pharmaceutical business development manager at Applied Biosystems and a sales manager at PerkinElmer.


William Murray has been appointed division president, molecular biology at Applied Biosystems. He takes over for Catherine Burzik, the current president of Applied Biosystems, who had been leading the division since the company announced a restructuring last summer. Murray most recently served as group president of respiratory technologies for Viasys Healthcare. He also has held exec-utive positions at Medtronic. Applied Biosystems also announced other management appointments in the molecular biology division, including naming Carl Hull to the post of vice president and general manager, real-time PCR systems and microarrays. Stephen Kondor was named vice president and general manager, genetic analysis, and Peter Dansky was named senior director and general manager, core PCR and DNA synthesis.


Stephen Oldfield has left his position of vice president of worldwide marketing for Molecular Devices. A company spokesperson declined to provide details regarding Oldfield’s departure. But the firm did say that it has named Jan Hughes as the new vice president of worldwide marketing. Hughes previously served as vice president of product development for Molecular Devices’ high-throughput electrophysiology division.


Lipomics, a company developing tools for lipid metabolite analysis, said last week that Macdonald (Don) Morris has joined the company as CTO and vice president of bioinformatics. Morris served as senior scientist at Affymetrix from 1993 to 1998, and then worked at Incyte Genomics from 1998 to 2002 as associate director, director, and senior director of bioinformatics. After Incyte, Morris joined Expression Diagnostics as vice president of informatics.

 

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