Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Larry Tiffany, Dennis Rossi, Illumina, Duke University's Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology

Premium

People in the News

Larry Tiffany has joined Gene Logic as senior vice president and interim general manager of its genomics division, according to a June 27 Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

Tiffany, who previously served as vice president of international business development at Gene Logic, will replace Dennis Rossi, who left the company last month.

According to the filing, Tiffany's employment agreement began June 21 and runs through Aug. 31. The contract can be extended by mutual agreement. On an annualized basis, Tiffany will be paid $300,000.

 

New Product Watch

Illumina last week launched its Sentrix HumanHap650Y BeadChip, that covers all four populations studied by the International HapMap Project including the Yoruba of Nigeria.

The Yoruba population is very genetically diverse, and demands a higher number of SNPs than less-diverse, younger populations, like Europeans, to achieve equivalent genomic coverage, Illumina said.

The HumanHap650Y BeadChip contains over 650,000 SNP markers. The company said that the chip will be used by Duke University's Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology to analyze a 2,000-sample cohort of HIV-exposed African individuals that are and are not infected with the virus in order to identify gene variants that confer either resistance or susceptibility to infection.

The Scan

Missed Early Cases

A retrospective analysis of blood samples suggests early SARS-CoV-2 infections may have been missed in the US, the New York Times reports.

Limited Journal Editor Diversity

A survey finds low diversity among scientific and medical journal editors, according to The Scientist.

How Much of a Threat?

Science writes that need for a provision aimed at shoring up genomic data security within a new US bill is being questioned.

PNAS Papers on Historic Helicobacter Spread, Brain Development, C. difficile RNAs

In PNAS this week: Helicobacter genetic diversity gives insight into human migrations, gene expression patterns of brain development, and more.