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IP Roundup: Dec 1, 2009

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SRU Biosystems of Woburn, Mass., has received US Patent No. 7,622,027, "Biosensor electrophoresis." The patent claims methods of detecting, purifying, quantifying, and separating molecules using an electrophoresis-adapted biosensor. The apparatus includes: a) a colorimetric resonant label-free optical biosensor; b) a gel suitable for separation of molecules; and c) electrodes for applying a voltage to move any molecules in the gel to the one- or two-dimensional grating.


California Insitute of Technology of Pasadena has received US Patent No. 7,622,081, "Integrated active flux microfluidic devices and methods." The patent describes a microfabricated device for the rapid detection of DNA, proteins, or other molecules associated with a particular disease. In the device, the presence of molecules is correlated to a hybridization signal from an optically-detectable reporter associated with the bound molecules.


Intelligent Medical Devices of Cambridge, Mass., has received US Patent No. 7,622,250, "Clinically intelligent diagnostic devices and methods." The patent claims a method of determining the suitability of a therapeutic agent for treating at least one symptom for a condition in a subject. The method includes the steps of: a) applying a sample to multiplexed test containing probes associated with a cause of the symptoms and other probes for targets that show resistance, tolerance, intolerance, or susceptibility to the therapeutic agent; b) detecting the interactions; and c) analyzing the interactions to determine a cause of the symptom and to determine the suitability of the therapeutic agent to treat a cause of the condition.


Columbia University has received US Patent No. 7,622,279, "Photocleavable fluorescent nucleotides for DNA sequencing on chip constructed by site-specific coupling chemistry." The patent claims a method for determining the sequence of a DNA or an RNA, where about 1,000 or fewer copies of the DNA or RNA are bound to a solid substrate via 1.3-dipolar azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry and each copy of the DNA or RNA is a self-priming moiety.


Tufts University has received US Patent No. 7,622,294, "Methods for detecting target analytes and enzymatic reactions." The patent claims a microsphere-based analytic chemistry system and method for making it. Using the system, microspheres or particles carrying bioactive agents may be combined on a substrate to form an array. A variety of modified substrates can provide either discrete or non-discrete sites for accommodating the microspheres in either random or patterned distributions. The system can be used for detecting target analytes and screening large libraries of bioactive agents.


Edelmira Cabezas of San Diego has received US Patent No. 7,622,295, "Molecular microarrays and helical peptides." The patent claims methods for fabricating dense arrays of polymeric molecules in a highly multiplexed manner using semiconductor-processing-derived lithographic methods. The methods are adaptable to the synthesis of a variety of polymeric compounds.


Illumina has received US Patent No. 7,623,624, "Method and apparatus for labeling using optical identification elements characterized by X-ray diffraction." The patent claims an optical identification element for identifying an item. The optical identification element includes a binder material and one or more materials embedded in the binder material. The materials provide an encoded composite X-ray diffraction pattern when illuminated by an X-ray beam. The encoded composite X-ray diffraction pattern is indicative of the item, according to the inventors.


Stanford University has received US Patent No. 7,625,697, "Methods for constructing subarrays and subarrays made thereby." The patent claims a method and device for detecting or monitoring the treatment status of a selected physiological state or disease condition. The device has a subarray of genes that show a statistically significant change in gene-level expression when compared with the control expression levels for that gene. The method involves applying a reporter-labeled messenger nucleic acid fraction to the array in the device, and comparing the pattern of gene expression on the array with that produced by labeled messenger nucleic acid from control cells. Also claimed is a method of constructing the array.


Agilent Technologies has received US Patent No. 7,627,435, "Filtering of pixel signals during array scanning." The patent claims methods for evaluating a pixel signal produced during scanning of a chemical array by identifying a set of conformant digital signals for a pixel and integrating those signals. The patent also claims systems and programming for performing the methods, and an array scanner containing these systems and programming.

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