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Greg Lucier, Vicki Chandler, Titia de Lange, Kreatech Biotechnology, Beckman Coulter, and Sigma-Aldrich

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Greg Lucier has become a member of the board of trustees of the Burnham Institute, the La Jolla, Calif.-based institute said last week. He is president and chief executive officer of Invitrogen.



Vicki Chandler and Titia de Lange are among the 13 winners of the 2005 NIH Director's Pioneer Award announced by the National Institutes of Health last week. The award, which comes with $2.5 million in direct costs over five years, supports "exceptionally creative scientists who take innovative approaches to major challenges in biomedical research," according to NIH. Chandler is a professor of plant sciences and molecular and cellular biology at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where she studies the control of gene expression. De Lange is a professor and head of the laboratory of cell biology and genetics at Rockefeller University, where she studies telomeres.

 

New Product Watch

Kreatech Biotechnology last week launched its ULS labeling kits for protein science applications.

The Dutch company said the Serum ULS Protein Labeling and Fluorescent Detection Kit and the Cell Lysate ULS Protein Labeling and Fluorescent Detection Kit are intended for profiling of serum and cell lysate samples on high-content antibody arrays.

According to Kreatech, both have been validated on all currently available antibody array platforms.



Beckman Coulter last week launched its Biomek Fly-By Bar Code Reader for sample identification and microplate tracking during processing, the firm said.

According to Beckman, the reader can track sample during processing, confirming the identification and location and creating a "traceable data trail."

The bar code reader is also integrated with Beckman Coulter's Biomek Software and can be used on any Biomek NX or FX liquid handler that has gripper functionality. It can scan up to a stack of four microplates at a time, Beckman said.



Sigma-Aldrich this week launched its Panorama Human Cancer Version 1 Protein Functional Microarray.

Developed by Procognia and licensed exclusively through Sigma-Aldrich, the new protein microarray contains 130 folded proteins the firm claims are implicated in mediating cancer.



The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering said this week that it has developed a prototype microarray reader that provides what it deems a "minimum number of components and moving parts [to] help in minimizing costs, yet offering sufficient performance for most microarray reading needs."