By Justin Petrone

The National Institutes of Health has awarded GMS Biotech a phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant worth $115,762 to help it develop an array-based blood-screening device that the firm hopes will replace existing serological techniques used in blood banks.

Entitled "The transfusion chip: a simple, low cost microarray for DNA-based blood typing," the grant was awarded on Aug. 1 and is set to expire on Jan. 30, 2012.

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A new report highlights the potential threats posed by advances in synthetic biology, NPR reports.

A Bloomberg reporter tried to get her genetic data deleted, but found it's not so simple to do.

Johns Hopkins University's Steven Salzberg and his colleagues have come up with a new estimate for the number of human genes, Nature News reports.

In Genome Research this week: study of intra-tumor heterogeneity, workflow resources for EPIGEN-Brazil, and more.

Jun
21
Sponsored by
Roche

This webinar will provide a detailed look at how a genomics lab implemented next-generation sequencing (NGS) liquid biopsy assays into its in-house clinical research program.