Skip to main content

European Research Consortium, Genome Canada, and FDA and Rosetta Biosoftware

Premium

European Research Consortium Receives $1.6M from EU to Develop Array-Based Sequencing Technology

A consortium of European companies and research institutions has received $1.6 million in funding from the European Commission to develop an array-based sequencing-by-synthesis technology from Quiatech, the Uppsala, Sweden-based company said last week.

Quiatech, as the project coordinator, will be responsible for dispersing the funds, according to Torbjorn Pettersson, a company spokesperson.

Besides Quiatech, members of the consortium are Asper Biotech of Tartu, Estonia; Fermentas of Vilnius, Lithuania; the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Tartu University in Estonia, and Silex Microsystems of Järfälla, Sweden.

The aim of the two-year project, to commence at the end of August, is to develop an array platform with thousands of oligonucleotide features for sequencing by synthesis. In a second phase, for which they may involve additional partners, the members plan to commercialize the resulting technology.


Genome Canada Doles Out Another $150M for 33 Genomics and Proteomics Projects; Other Funds Bring Total to $290M

Genome Canada last week announced CA$346 million ($290 million) in funding for 33 new genomics and proteomics research projects.

Genome Canada provides CA$179.3 million of the total, with 80 percent of the remainder coming from other public funding sources in Canada. Other contributions are provided by private sources in Canada, as well as international public and private sector partners.

"Stretching government dollars through collaborations with other governments and partners maximizes our research capacity," David Emerson, Canada's minister of industry, who is responsible for Genome Canada, said in a statement.

The research topics span health, agriculture, forestry, fisheries, new technologies, and ethics. A complete list of the 33 projects can be found here.

Since 2000, Genome Canada has received CA$600 million in total from the government of Canada for research in genomics and proteomics.


FDA to Use Rosetta's Resolver System for Data Submission Analysis

The US Food and Drug Administration will use Rosetta Biosoftware's Rosetta Resolver system for genomic data management and analysis in order to analyze microarray data from sponsors, Rosetta said last week.

According to Rosetta, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, an arm of the FDA, will use the system when evaluating genomic data submitted through the voluntary genomic data submissions program the agency initiated this year.

The system will be used to "understand, learn from, and reproduce analyses conducted by pharmaceutical companies who voluntarily submit genomics data," Rosetta said.

Financial details were not discussed.

 

The Scan

Call to Look Again

More than a dozen researchers penned a letter in Science saying a previous investigation into the origin of SARS-CoV-2 did not give theories equal consideration.

Not Always Trusted

In a new poll, slightly more than half of US adults have a great deal or quite a lot of trust in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Hill reports.

Identified Decades Later

A genetic genealogy approach has identified "Christy Crystal Creek," the New York Times reports.

Science Papers Report on Splicing Enhancer, Point of Care Test for Sexual Transmitted Disease

In Science this week: a novel RNA structural element that acts as a splicing enhancer, and more.