Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Covance Closes Acquisition of Merck Gene Expression Group

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Clinical research and pharmaceutical services firm Covance said yesterday that it has closed its acquisition of Merck's Seattle-based gene expression lab.

The financial terms of the purchase, announced last month, were not disclosed, but Merck has agreed to purchase of a five-year genomic analysis services contract worth $145 million as part of the deal.

Covance said that it is now controlling operations at the Seattle lab, the former headquarters of Merck's Rosetta Inpharmatics subsidiary, and that the lab's staff now works for Covance.

"We recognized the need to expand our footprint in the important and growing genomics testing market and this transaction provided both a superior and quicker entry point than the build or buy options we considered," Joe Herring, chairman and CEO of Covance, said in a statement when the deal was announced on July 30.

"The overall size of the genomics market is estimated at several hundred million dollars per year, including services for discovery/preclinical and clinical trials support," Herring said.

The Scan

Study Links Evolution of Longevity, Social Organization in Mammals

With the help of comparative phylogenetics and transcriptomics, researchers in Nature Communications see ties between lifespan and social organization in mammals.

Tumor Microenvironment Immune Score Provides Immunotherapy Response, Prognostic Insights

Using multiple in situ analyses and RNA sequence data, researchers in eBioMedicine have developed a score associated with immunotherapy response or survival.

CRISPR-Based Method for Finding Cancer-Associated Exosomal MicroRNAs in Blood

A team from China presents in ACS Sensors a liposome-mediated membrane fusion strategy for detecting miRNAs carried in exosomes in the blood with a CRISPR-mediated reporter system.

Drug Response Variants May Be Distinct in Somatic, Germline Samples

Based on variants from across 21 drug response genes, researchers in The Pharmacogenomics Journal suspect that tumor-only DNA sequences may miss drug response clues found in the germline.