Agilent Technologies this week rolled out its SurePrint G3 microarray platform, which contains up to one million probes on a standard 1x3 inch glass slide — up from 244,000 probes on the last version of its chips.

Initial applications available in the G3 format are for comparative genomic hybridization and copy number variation, but Agilent has pledged that all of its array-based applications — which include gene expression, microRNA expression, methylation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and others — will eventually be available on the higher-density chips.

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