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Applera, Nanogen, Stratagene, Genset, The President and Fellows of Harvard College of Cambridge, Mass., Agilix, GenoRx

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Applera has received several US patents the past two weeks. Among them are US Patent No. 6,825,336, “Polymorphisms in known genes associated with osteoporosis, methods of detection and uses thereof.” The patent covers an invention based on the discovery of SNPs in the genes known to contribute to osteoporosis. Such SNPs can lead to a variety of disorders that are mediated/modulated by a variant osteoporosis-associated protein. US Patent No. 6,825,026, “Isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding human synthase proteins, and uses thereof,” covers amino acid sequences of peptides that are encoded by genes within the human genome. US Patent No. 6,825,022, “Isolated human metalloprotease proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding human protease proteins, and uses thereof,” covers amino acid sequences of peptides that are encoded by genes within the human genome, the protease peptides of the present invention. US Patent No. 6,825,025, “Isolated human zinc metalloprotease, nucleic acid molecules encoding said enzymes, and uses thereof,” covers amino acid sequences of peptides that are encoded by genes within the human genome, the enzyme peptides of the present invention. US Patent No. 6,821,765, “Isolated human kinase proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding human kinase proteins, and uses thereof,” covers amino acid sequences of peptides that are encoded by genes within the human genome, the kinase peptides of the present invention.


Nanogen has received US Patent No. 6,821,729, “Devices for molecular biological analysis and diagnostic including waveguides.” The patent covers an electronic device for performing active biological operations. It couples optical waveguides with a DNA microarray used for performing biological operations and illuminating it at an angle that allows the size and complexity of the diagnostic instrument to be reduced.


Stratagene of La Jolla, Calif., has received US Patent No. 6,825,330, “Compositions and methods using platinum compounds for nucleic acid labeling.” The patent covers novel platinum-based compounds for labeling biomolecules that irreversibly attach to a target biomolecule via coordination of a platinum metal center with certain atoms on the target biomolecule. The patent also covers methods of making the platinum-based labeling compounds, probes labeled with such compounds, methods of making such labeled probes, and kits comprising the novel platinum-based labeling compounds and/or probes labeled with them. Also covered are methods of using probes labeled with platinum-based labeling compounds of the invention, particularly array and microarray hybridization methods.


Genset of Paris, has received US Patent No. 6,825,004, “Nucleic acids encoding human TCB-1 protein and polymorphic markers thereof.” The patent covers genomic and cDNA sequences of the human TBC-1 gene and polypeptides encoded by the TBC-1 gene. The invention also deals with antibodies directed specifically against such polypeptides that are useful as diagnostic reagents. The patent also covers biallelic markers of the TBC-1 gene useful in genetic analysis.


The President and Fellows of Harvard College of Cambridge, Mass., have received US Patent No. 6,824,987, “Small molecule printing.” The patent covers compositions and methods to facilitate the identification of compounds that are capable of interacting with a biological macromolecule of interest. In one aspect, a composition is provided that comprises an array of one or more types of chemical compounds attached to a solid support, wherein the density of the array of compounds is at least 1,000 spots per centimeter. In particularly preferred embodiments, these compounds are attached to the solid support through a covalent interaction.


Agilix of New Haven, Conn., has received US Patent No. 6,824,981, “Ultra-sensitive detection systems using alterable peptide tags.” The patent covers compositions and methods for sensitive detection of one or multiple analytes. In general, the methods involve the use of special label components, referred to as reporter signals, which can be associated with, incorporated into, or otherwise linked to the analytes.


GenoRx of Hayward, Calif., has received US Patent No. 6,824,974, “Electronic detection of biological molecules using thin layers.” This invention provides novel sensors that facilitate the detection of essentially any analyte. In general, the biosensors of this invention utilize a binding agent to specifically bind to one or more target analytes. In preferred embodiments, the biomolecules span a gap between two electrodes. Binding of the target analyte changes conductivity of the sensor, thereby facilitating ready detection of the binding event and thus detection and/or quantitation of the bound analyte.