Three weeks ago they were in stealth mode. Now the three players in nascent personal-genetics marketplace are ready to take orders.
 
But despite some obvious similarities between the firms — startups Navigenics, 23andMe, and genetics veteran DeCode Genetics each offers to assess an individual’s genome for disease risk and other traits — they differ in their history and marketing approach, and in how they view the fledgling field’s core technology, which happens to be arrays.
 

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US News & World Report writes that genetic testing of lung tumors can help identify treatments for patients.

A team of researchers plans to sample Loch Ness for environmental DNA, according to Newsweek.

The New York Times writes about the appearance of mosaicism in healthy people.

In PNAS this week: insecticide resistance patterns Anopheles gambiae mosquito, transcriptome patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during infection, and more.

Jun
19
Sponsored by
ACD

This webinar will provide evidence for the use of RNA in situ hybridization (RNA ISH) as a replacement for immunohistochemistry (IHC) in cancer research and diagnostic applications.

Jun
21
Sponsored by
Roche

This webinar will provide a detailed look at how a genomics lab implemented next-generation sequencing (NGS) liquid biopsy assays into its in-house clinical research program.