Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Agilent to Provide Service and Support for NimbleGen as Roche Shutters Microarray Business

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Agilent Technologies and Roche today announced that Agilent will provide service to NimbleGen microarray customers as Roche shutters that business.

Researchers using NimbleGen microarrays for all applications can transition to Agilent arrays, effective immediately with minimal disruptions, the companies said. Because of the similarities of the two firms' technologies and products, Agilent microarrays can be run on the NimbleGen MS200 Microarray Scanner.

"With Agilent as a leading global supplier of microarray technology, we are convinced researchers will be provided with the highest compatibility to NimbleGen products and services, and believe that they will continue to receive the exceptional service and support they have come to expect," Dan Zabrowski, head of Roche Applied Science, said in a statement.

"Our field service personnel are working directly with individual researchers to help convert their NimbleGen designs, and they will continue to provide enhanced service and support throughout the transition period and beyond," Robert Schueren, vice president and general manager of Agilent's Genomics Systems Division, added. "Additionally, Agilent is also enabling customers to read their arrays on NimbleGen scanners, eliminating the need to invest in capital equipment."

Financial and other terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Roche decided to discontinue the NimbleGen microarray products in June and sought a buyer for the business, as GenomeWeb Daily News' sister publication BioArray News reported at the time.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.