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Yes, but Is it in IMAX?

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Researchers at the University of Leeds in the UK think a tumor might be easier to see if a doctor could image a patient's organs in three dimensions, says BBC News' Katia Moskvitch. So they created a method of generating high resolution 3D images of various tissues — the next-generation of digital microscopy, if you will — and recently published their study in the American Journal of Pathology. "A 3D image could help provide much more information than a simple 2D scan," Moskvitch says. "To create one, a piece of tissue must be cut with an ultra-precise machine called microtome into hundreds of very thin slices. Each slice is then put onto a 1mm-thick piece of glass and loaded into a digital scanner. The scanner then creates 2D impressions of each cross-section, and this is where the new technology comes into play." The software created by the Leeds researchers stacks the 2D images together to form a 3D shape. The team says this could help oncologists see small tumors, or even gauge a tumor's proximity to nearby blood vessels to see how easy it would be to remove.

The Scan

Genome Sequences Reveal Range Mutations in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Researchers in Nature Genetics detect somatic mutation variation across iPSCs generated from blood or skin fibroblast cell sources, along with selection for BCOR gene mutations.

Researchers Reprogram Plant Roots With Synthetic Genetic Circuit Strategy

Root gene expression was altered with the help of genetic circuits built around a series of synthetic transcriptional regulators in the Nicotiana benthamiana plant in a Science paper.

Infectious Disease Tracking Study Compares Genome Sequencing Approaches

Researchers in BMC Genomics see advantages for capture-based Illumina sequencing and amplicon-based sequencing on the Nanopore instrument, depending on the situation or samples available.

LINE-1 Linked to Premature Aging Conditions

Researchers report in Science Translational Medicine that the accumulation of LINE-1 RNA contributes to premature aging conditions and that symptoms can be improved by targeting them.