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USC, Johns Hopkins Win $10.4M from NCI

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The University of Southern California and Johns Hopkins University have been awarded $10.4 million from the National Cancer Institute for cancer epigenomics research that will contribute data to NCI's Cancer Genome Atlas program.

Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, JHU and USC's Epigenome Center will use the funding to collect epigenomic data from all major types of cancer over the next five years, USC and JHU said recently.

"The data we produce and analyze will lead to new targets for drug development and a better understanding of why some patients respond better to certain drug treatments than others," USC Epigenome Center Director Peter Laird said in a statement.

The USC Epigenome Center will be responsible for all epigenetic data production for the cancer atlas project, which will generate and analyze data on several types of molecular changes, including mutations, chromosomal copy number alterations, and gene expression.

"We've learned that in addition to the DNA damage that happens at the genetic level, cancers can arise because of abnormal changes that occur in the way DNA is packaged," Stephen Baylin, JHU's Kimmel Cancer Center's deputy director, said in a statement.

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