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University of Chicago Licenses PGx Test to Mayo

NEW YORK, Dec. 29 (GenomeWeb News) - University of Chicago researchers licensed a pharmacogenomics test for colorectal cancer patients to teh Mayo Clinic, the university said last week.

 

The UGT1A1 test determines which patients are likely to have an adverse reaction to irinotecan hydrochloride (Camptosar), a key component of the standard first-line treatment for advanced cancers of the colon and rectum.

 

Through this licensing agreement, the clinic's reference laboratory, Mayo Medical Laboratories, will provide the test to patients nationwide.

 

Mayo acquired an exclusive license from the university, as well as the right to sub-license the test.

 

Mayo recently sub-licensed the rights under the University of Chicago patent to Third Wave Technologies. While Third Wave received FDA approval for the genetic test in August, only patients enrolled in studies at the University of Chicago previously had access to it.

 

In June, the FDA relabeled Camptosar to include a warning that patients with a particular UGT1A1 genotype should receive a lower starting dose.

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