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UK Plans Livestock, Agriculture Genome Center

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The UK's Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council has launched a center that will use genomics to support food security and animal health research.

The Genome Analysis Centre (TCAG) will be housed in the Norwich Research Park and will provide genome sequencing services for programs aimed at improving food security, protecting agriculture from exotic animal disease, and to use weaknesses in microbes to develop new ways to destroy bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

TCAG also will serve as a center of excellence in bioinformatics that will handle and analyze genomic data from the livestock and agriculture programs and data from other facilities.

Partners in the new center include BBSRC, East of England Development Agency, Norfolk County Council, South Norfolk Council, Norwich City Council, and the Greater Norwich Development Partnership. BBSRC said that it is providing the majority of the £13.5M ($19.8 million) investment in the center and will "underwrite its running costs for several years, but the partners are all making significant contributions."

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