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UK Insurance Group Extends Ban on Requiring Genetic Test Information

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A UK insurance industry group has decided to extend a rule through the year 2014 that keeps insurance customers from having to disclose genetic information from predictive tests.
 
The Association of British Insurers agreed on June 13 to extend a moratorium that was initiated in 2001 on insurance companies requiring results from customers.
 
The extension on the moratorium “means people can insure themselves and their families, even if they have had an adverse result from a predictive genetic test,” ABI Director General Stephen Haddrill said in a statement. He said it “has proved effective since its introduction” and that it “works well for consumers.”
 
The agreement to extend the moratorium through 2014 came after a scheduled review of the policy, and the next review will take place in 2011.
 
The moratorium covers policies worth up to £500,000 ($987,000) for life insurance and £300,000 for critical illness insurance.
 
Above these levels, the group said, its member insurers have agreed not to use predictive genetic tests unless the test has been approved by the government.
 
According to ABI, the only genetic test approved so far by the Genetics and Insurance Committee is for Huntington’s Disease and is for life insurance policies valued over £500,000.
 

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